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Fathers and Sons: Chiseled in Love

The bond between a father and son is precious. Often a boy looks to his parent for guidance, advice, and example. Think about your relationship with your parents. Are there moments you can reflect upon when this occurred? How did these instances mold you into the person you are today? As a parent have you passed on these treasures to your children? How will this time together impact the rest of your lives?


Enjoy this brief excerpt from Sharing Stories of Jesus with Children as well as my reflection and scripture reference.


A wooden table is laden with primitive tools and a father wraps his arms around his son together holding a hammer and fastening a nail.


Hammers and Nails


Nazareth is home

to a boy now a man.

A carpenter by trade

a hammer in his hand.

A father he loved

taught him everything he knew.

Now working alone

some days he feels blue.

Cutting and sanding

precisions just right,

traveling to cities

often at night.

A father and son

whose love forged a bond

lasting stories that

will forever go on.

Caring and creating

a labor of love

now Joseph observes

from heaven above.

Jesus has learned

life lessons from dad

now a new career’s beginning

from the one he has had.

God has a plan and

together they’ll go

his will to be done

now and tomorrow.


If you enjoyed this poem click on the books link within this website for easy access to purchasing Sharing Stories of Jesus with Children. God Bless You. Reflection:

The bond between a father and son is precious. Often a boy looks to his parent for guidance, advice, and example. Think about your relationship with your parents. Are there moments you can reflect upon when this occurred? How did these instances mold you into the person you are today? As a parent have you passed on these treasures to your children? How will this time together impact the rest of your lives?


In this story what makes this bond even more special is that Joseph is Jesus’ “adopted” earthly father. God is his “real” father. From the moment Joseph held him in his arms “adoption” never came into play for the child was his to love. Many parents of adoptive children can relate to this relationship.


Social and professional exchanges unified a father and son in Biblical times. The art of carpentry was passed down from father to son. Many young children enjoy having toy tool sets so they can imitate their father as he works in the yard or garage. Jesus was no exception to this but as he grew, he took on the responsibility of providing for his family along side his father as they traveled to complete projects and craft both items of function and artistry.


Now Joseph has passed, and Jesus is alone to carry on the work. Like any son who has lost his father, the grief is difficult, but the memories lift his spirit. God has revealed to him that a career change is about to occur. He will lay down his tools and follow his heavenly father’s will to save mankind.


“Jesus' adopted father Joseph was a carpenter (Matthew 13:55 & Mark 6:3). The Greek word is Teckton which means builder. Now, some say he worked with wood, building tools, doors, shelves, tables etc. = carpenter. Others say because of the region and the resources were rock, and most everything was built from rock, then he built millstones, winepresses, houses, etc. = stonemason. There is no real evidence to clarify exactly what Joseph was a builder of, but we know that he was a Teckton = Builder. Now, in the Jewish culture of that time (1st century) it was required of the father to teach the son their trade at age 12 and find a wife for them around the age of 20. Joseph being very Jewish would have adhered to this practice and began teaching Jesus at 12 his trade of being a builder.


Given that Israel's buildings were constructed of stones and rocks, Jesus likely worked as a stonemason rather than a carpenter. He probably spent hours helping his father shape and cut stones. “ That the World May Know Ministries


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